Deductive Learning vs Inductive Learning

Deductive reasoning works from the more general to the more specific. Sometimes this is informally called a “top-down” approach. We might begin with thinking up a theoryabout our topic of interest. We then narrow that down into more specifichypotheses that we can test. We narrow down even further when we collect observations to address the hypotheses. This ultimately leads us to be able to test the hypotheses with specific data — a confirmation (or not) of our original theories.

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Deductive reasoning is a basic form of valid reasoning. Deductive reasoning, or deduction, starts out with a general statement, or hypothesis, and examines the possibilities to reach a specific, logical conclusion.

Inductive reasoning works the other way, moving from specific observations to broader generalizations and theories. Informally, we sometimes call this a “bottom up” approach (please note that it’s “bottom up” and not “bottomsup” which is the kind of thing the bartender says to customers when he’s trying to close for the night!). In inductive reasoning, we begin with specific observations and measures, begin to detect patterns and regularities, formulate some tentative hypotheses that we can explore, and finally end up developing some general conclusions or theories.

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Inductive reasoning is the opposite of deductive reasoning. Inductive reasoning makes broad generalizations from specific observations.

Inductive inference is the process of reaching a general conclusion from specific examples.

Inductive Learning Hypothesis: any hypothesis found to approximate the target function well over a sufficiently large set of training examples will also approximate the target function well over other unobserved examples.

The inductive bias of a learning algorithm is the set of assumptions that the learner uses to predict outputs given inputs that it has not encountered (Mitchell, 1980).

Courtesy:

http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/dedind.php

http://www.livescience.com/21569-deduction-vs-induction.html

http://www2.cs.uregina.ca/~dbd/cs831/notes/ml/2_inference.html

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